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6.5.3 Restoring a logical domain to the pre-maintenance state


6.5.3 Restoring a logical domain to the pre-maintenance state
This section describes the flow of work in restoring a logical domain after FRU maintenance to the pre-maintenance state. For details on the work and the commands used, see "3.2  Operations and Commands Related to Logical Domain Configurations" in the Fujitsu SPARC M12 and Fujitsu M10/SPARC M10 Domain Configuration Guide and the Oracle VM Server for SPARC Reference Manual for the version you are using.
Note - If you have replaced the CPU memory unit lower in a system that has internal disks in a hardware RAID configuration, you need to reactivate the hardware RAID volume. For details, see "14.2.11  Re-enabling a Hardware RAID Volume" in the Fujitsu SPARC M12 and Fujitsu M10/SPARC M10 System Operation and Administration Guide.
The following procedure returns a logical domain to the state in the ldm list-io output results that were checked in step 4 in "5.3.2  Checking the assignment status of I/O devices."
Returning the root complex to the control domain
Return the root complex that was released from the control domain to the control domain.
The work procedure varies depending on whether the dynamic reconfiguration function (Dynamic PCIe bus assignment) for the root complex is used. For details, see Table 6-1.
Table 6-1  Procedure that depends on whether the dynamic reconfiguration function (Dynamic PCIe bus assignment) for the root complex is used
-: Unnecessary
Item Task Command Dynamic reconfiguration function used (*1) Dynamic reconfiguration function not used (*2)
1 Set the control domain to delayed reconfiguration. ldm start-reconf - Yes
2 Assign the physical I/O device to the control domain. ldm add-io Yes Yes
3 Restart the control domain. shutdown -i6 -g0 -y - Yes
*1 Dynamic reconfiguration of the root complex is supported by XCP 2240 or later and Oracle VM Server for SPARC 3.2 or later. In addition, the control domain must be Oracle Solaris 11.2 SRU11.2.8 or later.
*2 If dynamic reconfiguration of the root complex is not used, set the control domain to delayed reconfiguration, and then assign the physical I/O device.
  1. Log in to Oracle Solaris on the control domain of the physical partition.
  2. Transition the control domain to delayed reconfiguration mode.
    If you are dynamically reconfiguring the root complex, this step is unnecessary. Go to step 3.
# ldm start-reconf <control domain name>
  1. Reassign the physical I/O device to the control domain.
# ldm add-io <physical I/O device name> <control domain name>
  1. Restart Oracle Solaris on the control domain.
    If you are dynamically reconfiguring the root complex, this step is unnecessary.
# shutdown -i6 -g0 -y
Note - When set to delayed reconfiguration mode, the control domain does not have control over the guest domains. If you have set the control domain to delayed reconfiguration mode, restart the control domain as soon as possible.
Returning the root complex to the root domain
Return the physical I/O device (root complex) that was released from the root domain to the root domain.
The work procedure varies depending on whether the dynamic reconfiguration function (Dynamic PCIe bus assignment) for the root complex is used. For details, see Table 6-2.
Table 6-2  Procedure that depends on whether the dynamic reconfiguration function (Dynamic PCIe bus assignment) for the root complex is used
-: Unnecessary
Item Task Command Dynamic reconfiguration function used (*1) Dynamic reconfiguration function not used (*2)
1 Assign the physical I/O device (root complex) to the root domain. ldm add-io Yes Yes
2 Start the root domain. ldm start-domain - Yes
*1 Dynamic reconfiguration of the root complex is supported by XCP 2240 or later and Oracle VM Server for SPARC 3.2 or later. In addition, the root domain must be Oracle Solaris 11.2 SRU11.2.8 or later.
*2 If dynamic reconfiguration of the root complex is not used, assign the physical I/O device (root complex), and then start the root domain.
  1. Reassign the I/O device (PCIe root complex) released from the root domain to the root domain.
# ldm add-io <physical I/O device name> <root domain name>
  1. Start the root domain.
    If you are dynamically reconfiguring the root complex, this step is unnecessary.
# ldm start-domain <root domain name>
Returning the physical I/O device to the I/O domain
If you released the I/O device assigned to an I/O domain before maintenance according to "When using virtual I/O" in "5.4.1  Releasing the assignment of I/O devices," restore the physical I/O device (PCIe end point device) to its original status.
PCIe slots are automatically assigned to the root domain. Therefore, to reassign them to I/O domains, they must be released from the root domain and then reassigned.
The work procedure varies depending on whether the dynamic reconfiguration function for the PCIe end point device is used. For details, see Table 6-3.
Table 6-3  Procedure that depends on whether the dynamic reconfiguration function for the PCIe end point device is used
-: Unnecessary
Item Task Command Dynamic reconfiguration function used (*1) Dynamic reconfiguration function not used
1 Enable the hotplug service. svcadm enable hotplug Yes Yes (*2)
2 Set the root domain to delayed reconfiguration. ldm start-reconf - Yes
3 Delete the physical IO from the root domain. ldm remove-io Yes Yes
4 Restart the root domain. shutdown -i6 -g0 -y - Yes
5 Assign physical I/O to the root domain. ldm add-io Yes Yes
6 Start the I/O domain. ldm start-domain - Yes
7 Disable the hotplug service. svcadm disable hotplug Yes Yes (*2)
*1 Dynamic reconfiguration of the PCIe end point device is supported by XCP 2230 or later and Oracle VM Server for SPARC 3.1.1.1 or later.
*2 If dynamic reconfiguration of the PCIe end point device is not used, the hotplug service operates regardless of its enable/disable setting.
  1. If the hotplug service is disabled for the I/O and root domains, execute the svcadm enable command to enable the hotplug service.
# svcadm enable hotplug
  1. Transition the root domain to delayed reconfiguration mode.
    If you are using the dynamic reconfiguration function for the PCIe end point device, this step is unnecessary. Go to step 5.
# ldm start-reconf <root domain name>
  1. Delete the physical I/O device from the root domain.
# ldm remove-io <device name> <root domain name>
  1. Log in to the root domain, and restart Oracle Solaris on the root domain.
    If you are using the dynamic reconfiguration function for the PCIe end point device, this step is unnecessary. Go to step 5.
# telnet localhost <port number>
...

# shutdown -i6 -g0 -y
  1. Assign the physical I/O device to the I/O domain.
# ldm add-io <device name> <I/O domain name>
  1. Start the I/O domain.
    If you are using the dynamic reconfiguration function for the PCIe end point device, this step is unnecessary. Go to step 7.
# ldm start <I/O domain name>
  1. If you need to disable the hotplug service for the I/O and root domains, disable the hotplug service.
# svcadm disable hotplug
Restoring the SR-IOV function
Suppose that the SR-IOV function was used to delete and discard a virtual function (VF) before maintenance, according to "When using the SR-IOV virtual function" in "5.4.1  Releasing the assignment of I/O devices." In this case, create the virtual function again and assign it to the domain based on the retained output results from the idm list-io command.
The work procedure differs between the dynamic SR-IOV function and the static SR-IOV function. For details, see Table 6-4.
Table 6-4  Procedure that depends on the function: dynamic SR-IOV function or static SR-IOV function
-: Unnecessary
Item Task Command Dynamic SR-IOV function used (*1) Static SR-IOV function used
1 Enable the hotplug service. svcadm enable hotplug Yes Yes (*2)
2 Set the PF root domain to delayed reconfiguration. ldm start-reconf - Yes
3 Create a VF. ldm create-vf Yes Yes
4 Assign the VF to the I/O domain. ldm add-io Yes Yes
5 Restart the root domain. shutdown -i6 -g0 -y - Yes
6 Start the I/O domain. start-domain - Yes
7 Disable the hotplug service. svcadm disable hotplug Yes Yes (*2)
*1 Dynamic reconfiguration for the SR-IOV virtual function is supported by XCP 2210 or later and Oracle VM Server for SPARC 3.1 or later.
*2 If static reconfiguration for the SR-IOV virtual function is used, the hotplug service operates regardless of its enable/disable setting.
  1. If the hotplug service is disabled for the I/O and root domains, execute the svcadm enable command to enable the hotplug service.
# svcadm enable hotplug
  1. Transition the root domain that has the assigned physical function (PF) to delayed reconfiguration mode.
    If the dynamic SR-IOV function is used, this step is unnecessary. Go to step 3.
# ldm start-reconf <root domain name>
  1. Create the virtual function.
# ldm create-vf <PF name>
  1. Assign the virtual function (VF) to the I/O domain.
# ldm add-io <VF name> <I/O domain name>
  1. Log in to the root domain, and restart Oracle Solaris.
    If the dynamic SR-IOV function is used, this step is unnecessary. Go to step 7.
# telnet localhost <port name>
...

# shutdown -i6 -g0 -y
  1. Start the I/O domain.
# ldm start <I/O domain name>
  1. If you need to disable the hotplug service for the I/O and root domains, disable the hotplug service.
# svcadm disable hotplug
  1. If a virtual device of a guest domain has been kept unused or the redundant configuration was released in "5.4.1  Releasing the assignment of I/O devices," resume the use of the virtual device or set the redundant configuration again.
    For details on the work, see the manual for the application being used.
  2. Confirm that the status of the physical I/O device is the same as before maintenance.
# ldm list-io
  1. Confirm that the operating condition of the logical domain remains unchanged.
# ldm list-domain
Restoring a virtual device
If a virtual device (vnet, vdisk) of a guest domain has been kept unused before maintenance, return it to its original status.
  1. If a virtual device of a guest domain has been kept unused or the redundant configuration was released, resume the use of the virtual device or set the redundant configuration again.
    For details on the work, see the manual for the application being used.
  1. The following is a command execution example for configuring the virtual disk (vdisk11) and virtual network device (vnet10) in a logical domain.
# ldm add-vdisk vdisk11 guest0
# ldm add-vnet vnet10 guest0
  1. Confirm that the status of the virtual device is the same as before maintenance.
# ldm list-domain -l
  1. Confirm that the operating condition of the logical domain remains unchanged.
# ldm list-domain